Search results

Injury Data Index

As part of our Statistics & Methods Workgroup's aims, we are pleased to offer this index for researchers and others to use to locate and access major datasets containing injury statistics and data.  This is an ongoing project, and we welcome your ideas for other datasets to include.  Over time, descriptive detail will deepen, as we work to make this a rich resources for injury researchers across the country.

Click on dataset name for detailed information.

Search results

  1. National Incident-Based Reporting System

    Bureau of Justice Statistics

    The National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) is an incident-based reporting system for crimes known to the police. For each crime incident coming to the attention of law enforcement, a variety of data are collected about the incident. These data include the nature and types of specific offenses in the incident, characteristics of the victim(s) and offender(s), types and value of property stolen and recovered, and characteristics of persons arrested in connection with a crime incident.

  2. Bureau of Justice: Alcohol and Crime

    Bureau of Justice Statistics

    Includes analyses from four data sources: the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities (SISFCF), and the Survey of Inmates in Local Jails (SILJ). Each data source examines the involvement of alcohol and violent crime from different perspectives and different sets of criminal behaviors.

  3. Fatal Injury Reports

    CDC WISQARS

    WISQARS(tm) (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, pronounced "whiskers"). Fatal Injury Reports is an interactive database system that provides injury-related mortality data useful for research and for making informed public health decisions.  WISQARS offers three types of reports:  mortality reports, leading causes of death reports, and years of potential life lost reports (YPPL). Injury mortality reports provide number of injury deaths and death rates for specific external causes of injuries.  Leading causes of death reports provide the number of injury-related deaths relative to the number of other leading causes of death in the United States or in individual states.  Years of potential life lost (YPLL) reports compare premature mortality (early death) between different causes of death.

  4. Compressed Mortality File (CDC)

    Compressed Mortality File

    The Compressed Mortality data include mortality and population counts for all U.S. counties for the years 1968 to 2010. Counts and rates of death can be obtained by underlying cause of death, state, county, age, race, sex, and year.

  5. Emergency Room Statistics on Intentional Violence

    Emergency Room Statistics on Intentional Violence

    Data on intentional injuries, such as domestic violence, rape, and child abuse, from a national sample of hospital emergency rooms. Through the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), information is obtained on characteristics of the victim and offender, victim-offender relationship, alcohol/drug involvement in the incident, and circumstances of the injury.

  6. Infant Deaths

    Infant Deaths

    This data collection provides counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year of age, occuring within the United States to U.S. residents. Information from death certificates has been linked to corresponding birth certificates. Data are available by county of mother's residence, child's age, underlying cause of death, gender, birth weight, birth plurality, birth order, gestational age at birth, period of prenatal care, maternal race and ethnicity, maternal age, maternal education and marital status. The data are produced by the National Center for Health Statistics.

  7. Intimate Partner Violence

    Bureau of Justice Statistics

    Presents data on nonfatal intimate partner violence among U.S. households from 1993 to 2010. Intimate partner violence includes rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault by a current or former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend. This report presents trends in intimate partner violence by sex, and examines intimate partner violence against women by the victim’s age, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, and household composition. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

    Highlights:

    • From 1994 to 2010, the overall rate of intimate partner violence in the United States declined by 64%, from 9.8 victimizations per 1,000 persons age 12 or older to 3.6 per 1,000.
    • Intimate partner violence declined by more than 60% for both males and females from 1994 to 2010.
    • From 1994 to 2010, about 4 in 5 victims of intimate partner violence were female.
    • Females ages 18 to 24 and 25 to 34 generally experienced the highest rates of intimate partner violence.
    • Compared to every other age group, a smaller percentage of female victims ages 12 to 17 were previously victimized by the same offender.
    • The rate of intimate partner violence for Hispanic females declined 78%, from 18.8 victimizations per 1,000 in 1994 to 4.1 per 1,000 in 2010.
    • Females living in households comprised of one female adult with children experienced intimate partner violence at a rate more than 10 times higher than households with married adults with children and 6 times higher than households with one female only.
  8. Mortality Multiple Cause of Death

    Mortality Multiple Cause of Death

    Mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) are a fundamental source of demographic, geographic, and cause-of-death information. This is one of the few sources of health-related data that are comparable for small geographic areas and are available for a long time period in the United States. The data are also used to present the characteristics of those dying in the United States, to determine life expectancy, and to compare mortality trends with other countries.

  9. Multiple Cause of Death

    Multiple Cause of Death

    The Multiple Cause of Death database contains mortality and population counts for all U.S. counties. Data are based on death certificates for U.S. residents. Each death certificate contains a single underlying cause of death, up to twenty additional multiple causes, and demographic data. The number of deaths, crude death rates, age-adjusted death rates and 95% confidence intervals for death rates can be obtained by cause of death (4 digit ICD-10 codes, 113 selected causes of death, 130 selected causes of infant death, drug and alcohol related causes of death, injury intent and injury mechanism categories), place of residence (national, region, division, state, and county), age (single-year-of age, 5-year age groups, 10-year age groups and infant age groups), race (American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black or African American, White), Hispanic ethnicity and gender. Data are also available by year, month and week day of death, place of death and urbanization categories, as well as whether an autopsy was performed.

  10. National Crime Victimization Survey

    National Crime Victimization Survey

    NCVS is the nation's primary source of information on criminal victimization. Each year, data are obtained from a nationally representative sample of about 40,000 households comprising nearly 75,000 persons on the frequency, characteristics and consequences of criminal victimization in the United States. Each household is interviewed twice during the year. The survey enables BJS to estimate the likelihood of victimization by rape, sexual assault, robbery, assault, theft, household burglary, and motor vehicle theft for the population as a whole as well as for segments of the population such as women, the elderly, members of various racial groups, city dwellers, or other groups. The NCVS provides the largest national forum for victims to describe the impact of crime and characteristics of violent offenders.

  11. National Fire Incident Reporting System

    National Fire Incident Reporting System

    NFIRS is the world's largest, national, annual database of fire incident information.
    50 states and the District of Columbia report NFIRS data. This data includes fatlalities to both firefighters and other fire victims.

  12. National Violent Death Reporting System

    National Violent Death Reporting System

    The National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) is a state-based surveillance system that links data from law enforcement, coroners and medical examiners, vital statistics, and crime laboratories to assist each participating state in designing and implementing tailored prevention and intervention efforts. NVDRS defines a death due to violence as "a death resulting from the intentional use of physical force or power against oneself, another person, or against a group or community." NVDRS collects information about homicides, suicides, deaths by legal intervention-excluding executions-and deaths of undetermined intent. In addition, information about unintentional firearm injury deaths (i.e., the individual did not intend to discharge the firearm) is collected, although these deaths are not considered violent deaths by the above definition. Deaths are included if their underlying causes (ICD codes) are included in these categories.

  13. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample

    Nationwide Emergency Department Sample

    The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) is a unique and powerful database that yields national estimates of emergency department (ED) visits. The NEDS was created to enable analyses of emergency department (ED) utilization patterns and support public health professionals, administrators, policymakers, and clinicians in their decision-making regarding this critical source of care. The ED serves a dual role in the U.S. healthcare system infrastructure as a point of entry for approximately 50% of inpatient hospital admissions and as a setting for treat-and-release outpatient visits.1

    • The NEDS is the largest all-payer ED database in the United States.
    • The NEDS was constructed using records from both the HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) and the State Inpatient Databases (SID). The SEDD capture information on ED visits that do not result in an admission (i.e., treat-and-release visits and transfers to another hospital). The SID contain information on patients initially seen in the emergency room and then admitted to the same hospital.
    • The NEDS contains between 25 and 30 million (unweighted) records for ED visits for over 950 hospitals and approximates a 20-percent stratified sample of U.S. hospital-based EDs.
    • The NEDS has many research applications, as it contains information about geographic characteristics, hospital characteristics, patient characteristics, and the nature of visits (e.g., common reasons for ED visits, including injuries).
    • The NEDS includes ED charge information for over 75% of patients, regardless of payer, including patients covered by Medicaid, private insurance, and the uninsured.
  14. State Ambulatory Surgery Databases

    State Ambulatory Surgery Databases

    The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) are a powerful set of databases, from data organizations in participating States, that capture surgeries performed on the same day in which patients are admitted and released. SASD data are available through the HCUP Central Distributor. The SASD contain the ambulatory surgery encounter abstracts in participating states, translated into a uniform format to facilitate multi-state comparisons and analyses. All of the databases include abstracts from hospital-affiliated ambulatory surgery sites. Some contain the universe of ambulatory surgery encounter abstracts for that State, including records from both hospital-affiliated and freestanding surgery centers. Composition and completeness of data files may vary from state to state. The SASD contain a core set of clinical and non-clinical information on all patients, regardless of payer, including persons covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, and the uninsured. In addition to the core set of uniform data elements common to all SASD, some include other elements, such as the patient's race. The SASD contain clinical and resource use information included in a typical discharge abstract, with safeguards to protect the privacy of individual patients, physicians, and hospitals (as required by data sources). 

  15. State Emergency Department Databases

    State Emergency Department Databases

    The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) are a powerful set of databases, from data organizations in participating states, that capture discharge information on all emergency department visits that do not result in an admission. Information on patients initially seen in the emergency room and then admitted to the hospital is included in the State Inpatient Databases (SID). SEDD data files beginning in data year 1999 are available through the HCUP Central Distributor. The SEDD contain the emergency department encounter abstracts in participating States, translated into a uniform format to facilitate multi-state comparisons and analyses. All of the databases include abstracts from hospital-affiliated emergency department sites. Composition and completeness of data files may vary from state to state. The SEDD contain a core set of clinical and non-clinical information on all patients, regardless of payer, including persons covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, and the uninsured. In addition to the core set of uniform data elements common to all SEDD, some state data include other elements, such as the patient's race.

  16. Underlying Cause of Death, 1999-2010

    Underlying Cause of Death, 1999-2010

    The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) are a powerful set of databases, from data organizations in participating states, that capture discharge information on all emergency department visits that do not result in an admission. Information on patients initially seen in the emergency room and then admitted to the hospital is included in the State Inpatient Databases (SID). SEDD data files beginning in data year 1999 are available through the HCUP Central Distributor. The SEDD contain the emergency department encounter abstracts in participating states, translated into a uniform format to facilitate multi-state comparisons and analyses. All of the databases include abstracts from hospital-affiliated emergency department sites. Composition and completeness of data files may vary from state to state. The SEDD contain a core set of clinical and non-clinical information on all patients, regardless of payer, including persons covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, and the uninsured. In addition to the core set of uniform data elements common to all SEDD, some state data include other elements, such as the patient's race.

  17. State Inpatient Databases

    State Inpatient Databases

    The State Inpatient Databases (SID) are a powerful set of hospital databases from data organizations in participating states. The SID contain the universe of the inpatient discharge abstracts in participating States, translated into a uniform format to facilitate multi-state comparisons and analyses. Together, the SID encompass about 97 percent of all annual discharges in the U.S. Some States include discharges from specialty facilities, such as acute psychiatric hospitals. The SID contain a core set of clinical and nonclinical information on all patients, regardless of payer, including persons covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, and the uninsured. In addition to the core set of uniform data elements common to all SID, some include other elements, such as the patient's race.

  18. The Kids' Inpatient Database

    The Kids' Inpatient Database

    The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) is a unique and powerful database of hospital inpatient stays for children. The KID was specifically designed to permit researchers to study a broad range of conditions and procedures related to child health issues. Researchers and policymakers can use the KID to identify, track, and analyze national trends in health care utilization, access, charges, quality, and outcomes.

  19. WISQARS Nonfatal Injury Reports

    WISQARS

    CDC’s WISQARS™ (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) is an interactive, online database that provides fatal and nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost of injury data from a variety of trusted sources. Researchers, the media, public health professionals, and the public can use WISQARS™ data to learn more about the public health and economic burden associated with unintentional and violence-related injury in the United States.

  20. SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health

    United States National Survey on Drug Use and Health

    The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug use in the United States. The surveys are designed to provide quarterly, as well as annual, estimates. Information is provided on the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco among members of United States households aged 12 and older. Questions include age at first use as well as lifetime, annual, and past-month usage for the following drug classes: marijuana, cocaine (and crack), hallucinogens, heroin, inhalants, alcohol, tobacco, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs, including pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives. The survey covers substance abuse treatment history and perceived need for treatment, and includes questions from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of Mental Disorders that allow diagnostic criteria to be applied. The survey includes questions concerning treatment for both substance abuse and mental health related disorders. Respondents are also asked about personal and family income sources and amounts, health care access and coverage, illegal activities and arrest record, problems resulting from the use of drugs, and needle-sharing. Questions introduced in previous administrations were retained in the 2002 survey, including questions asked only of respondents aged 12 to 17. These "youth experiences" items covered a variety of topics, such as neighborhood environment, illegal activities, gang involvement, drug use by friends, social support, extracurricular activities, exposure to substance abuse prevention and education programs, and perceived adult attitudes toward drug use and activities such as school work. Several measures focused on prevention related themes in this section. Also retained were questions on mental health and access to care, perceived risk of using drugs, perceived availability of drugs, driving and personal behavior, and cigar smoking. Questions on the tobacco brand used most often were introduced with the 1999 survey and have been retained through the 2002 survey. Demographic data include gender, race, age, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, job status, veteran status, and current household composition.