Injury Courses at the University of Michigan


Trainees in the region interested in pursuing a career/vocation in injury prevention may choose from a broad array of courses to develop their knowledge and skills.  University of Michigan’s support for injury education is vast, with significant educational and training resources.  Below you will find a listing of injury-related graduate-level courses currently available at the University of Michigan. This list is updated continually, and we will add more courses as we move forward.  Please contact us if you know of any courses we should add to the list.

Note: ‡ denotes REQUIRED courses that count toward the Certificate Program in Injury Science at University of Michigan. * denotes ELECTIVE courses that count toward the Certificate Program. Please refer to the complete requirements, available from the Registrar’s office, to fully understand which classes are required and which are electives. All elective courses are not noted in the list below.

GRADUATE COURSES

 U-M School of Social Work

SW 510: Share, Explore, Engage, Discover (SEED) Mini-course

This course will emphasize experiential, active, and engaged learning components and operationalize the three SEED goals: 1) Strengthen connection and community at the School of Social Work, 2) Explore PODS (privilege, oppression, diversity, & social justice), and 3) Learn foundation-level social work skills. Each theme will begin by attending a shared welcome experience. This course is designed for incoming graduate students with an interest in child welfare, juvenile justice, adolescent development and State intervention. Our discussions will be largely focused on these populations and systems of care within the United States. The class will combine a mix of in-class discussions/readings as well as experiences in the field (e.g. visits to juvenile detention facility and Detroit based program for high risk girls). We will broadly cover a range of pressing issues in the field including child neglect, inadequate levels of parenting, delinquency, disproportionate minority contact, the consequences of early traumatic experiences and the transition to adulthood for high risk populations of youth.

Credits: 1

Fall 2019

SW 618: Research-Informed Practices to Prevent Substance Abuse in Racial and Ethnic Minority Adolescents

This course will draw from multiple disciplines, including social work, epidemiology, public health, psychology, policy and couple and family therapy, to introduce students to theory and knowledge on substance abuse to inform social work practice with racial and ethnic minority adolescents in urban settings. This course will be guided by models, and the theoretical frameworks which inform them, that have been shown to be efficacious or effective in prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation of substance abuse in adolescents. Therefore, students will be introduced to research-informed substance abuse practices among racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents. For the purposes of this course, substance abuse will include both licit and illicit substances. Students will be asked to demonstrate the ways in which to apply research-informed theory and knowledge in practice settings with racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

SW 701-001 Practice in International Social Work

This course is intended to prepare social work students for involvement in social development interventions in an international arena. This course will focus selectively on the challenges developing countries face in improving the lives of its citizens and the roles social workers can play in solving them. Among the issues that may be included are: provision of basic life necessities, hunger and nutritional insufficiency, education, economic development, the strains related to urbanization and modernization, ethnic conflict, child protection, community and familial violence, environment and community health, organization and administration of human services, and citizen empowerment. Students will learn about strategies used by service providers, institutions, and self-help groups for the purposes of social transformation, community development, and enhancement of individual well-being. Central to the discourse will be an idiographic-nomothetic dialectic which counterposes what is universal and what is culturally specific about social welfare issues and interventions across countries and regions. Course readings and discussion will begin with a focus on the globalization of social problems. An array of skills will be drawn from the traditional practice armamentarium of micro and macro social work methods. Discourse will also focus on ways that these must be adapted to increase their relevance for work in developing regions of the world, in international aid or relief organizations and in programs for immigrants or refugees in this country.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

SW 707-001: Interpersonal Practice with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Clients

This course will address issues of concern to interpersonal practice clients that identify as Transgender, Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Questioning, or Non Straight (TLBGQNS). This course will build on basic IP skills and knowledge of, primarily, individual therapy. Issues which are of greater concern, or for which services and in some cases, knowledge are lacking for these groups will be reviewed. For example, these issues will include: the development of sexual identity, coming out, social stigma, substance abuse, HIV and AIDS, the interaction of discrimination due to gender and/or ethnicity with the discrimination due to sexual orientation, violence within relationships and violence against these groups, discrimination on the basis of orientation, suicide, family development and parenting, passing and community interaction, and policy. This course will closely focus on skills needed for working with these specific issues.

Credits: 3

Winter 2020

SW 708: Special Issues in Interpersonal Violence

This course will focus on issues of relevance for social work in the field of interpersonal violence. The topics will change over time, and thus it will be able to respond to the latest developments in the field. The course will integrate content on privilege, oppression, diversity, social justice, prevention and promotion, and ethics in each topic chosen. The seminal and emerging social science theories and research will be applied to the areas of violence being explored.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

SW 730: Practice Seminar in Child Maltreatment: Assessment and Treatment

This is a methods course intended to develop skills for child welfare practice, with special attention to child maltreatment. Students learn about the various contexts in which child welfare practice takes place and the skills and modalities that are used with children, youth, and families who are the focus of child welfare intervention. This course will prepare students to work with diverse client populations and will help them appreciate the imbalance of power between client and professional. Understanding the needs and responses of involuntary clients is an integral part of the course. Relevant evidence-based practices are taught and child welfare policies and practices are subjected to critical review. The first term will focus on assessment and the second on treatment.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019/Winter 2020

SW 739: Integrative Seminar: Child Maltreatment

This integrative seminar will integrate micro and macro levels of practice; research in child welfare and related fields, as the research relates to all levels of practice; the relationship of child maltreatment and other social problems; and perspectives from several disciplines, specifically social work, other mental health professions, law, and medicine, as these disciplines address problems of child maltreatment and child welfare. The seminar will highlight issues of social justice, disproportionality-particularly the over-representation of children and families of color in the child welfare system, and diverse populations, include children in general and poor children in particular. Prerequisites: Children & Youth Concentration or instructor’s permission.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

SW 741 (LAW 741-002, EAS 731, ECON 741, EDUC 717, PUBHLTH 741, PUBPOL 710, SI 605): Interdisciplinary Problem Solving (Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect)

This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). In Michigan, many children are subject to formal child abuse and neglect investigations, and those children are at high risk of subsequent maltreatment, poor school performance, foster care placement, and other adverse life outcomes. Multidisciplinary teams of students will develop tools to identify at-risk children, mitigate risks of maltreatment and removal from the home, and engage with at-risk families. Students will incorporate evidence and ideas from education, law, health sciences, public policy, social work, information, and other fields to develop innovative solutions. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

SW 796: Advanced Topics in Micro and Macro Social Work Bridging Gendered Fields: The Contested Spaces of Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol/Other Drugs

This course presents advanced topics in both micro and macro social work practice. The topics may include emerging cross-cutting practice methods, advanced application of methods covered in other required methods courses, and applications of methods in specific populations. This mini-course applies frameworks from social justice within innovative approaches from case studies of 36 organizations (from 21 states and Canada) working to address both Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Alcohol/Other Drug use (AOD). Students can focus on arenas most relevant for their concentrations [individual-level (e.g., screening and assessment, early phase crisis work, multiple types of groups), organization-level (e.g., staff hiring and training, mission and funding sources), community interactions and goals, and social policy questions and approaches].

Credits: 1

Winter 2020

 U-M School of Public Health

HMP 615: Introduction to Public Health Policy

This course gives introduction to the public health systems and policy issues public health systems practitioners face. Overview of public health policy interventions, theoretical motivations, influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environments in which policy decisions are made, and population health consequences of such decisions.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

HMP 653: Law and Public Health

The purpose of this course is to examine the legal context of the relationship the individual and the community, and to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: constitutional authority and limits on governmental intervention in public health (i.e., individual rights vs. society’s rights); the function of the interactions between courts, legislatures, and regulators; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in public health positions; how to recognize legal result and communicate with attorneys; and the process of public health regulation and potential legal barriers to public health intervention strategies. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include; the nature and scope of public health authority; constitutional constraints on public health initiatives; tobacco control; youth violence; injury prevention; the spread of communicable disease; and regulating environmental risk. This class can be taken as an elective, in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement, or as a BIC requirement.

Credits: 3

Winter 2020

HMP 693 – 001: Mental Health Policy in the United States

Students in this course will analyze mental health policies in the U.S. The class will meet once a week and have an interactive seminar format. We will approach various topics from both descriptive and analytical perspectives. Examples of topics include mental health insurance parity, the integration of mental health services and other health services, delivery of services in schools, delivery of services in prisons, and incentives influencing the balance between medication and therapy.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

HBEHED 677: Health Impacts of Immigration Law Enforcement in the U.S.

This course draws on the social-ecological model to consider the multi-level health impacts of immigration law enforcement on individuals, families and communities; the similarities between immigration enforcement conducted by ICE and law enforcement conducted by police; and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Empirical data, articles, books, and media will be used to catalyze discussion and analysis of how immigration law enforcement impacts mixed-status communities throughout the U.S. Through interactions with those who conducted and lived through law enforcement activities and the advocates and researchers who respond to enforcement, students will better understand the ways in which fear of state violence shapes health and health seeking behaviors throughout the community and contributes to racial health inequities.

Credits: 3

Winter 2020

 U-M School of Engineering

IOE 437: Automotive Human Factors
This course provides an overview of human factors and driving to help engineers design motor vehicles that are safe and easy to use, and to provide basic knowledge for those interested in conducting automotive human factors/ergonomics research. The focus is on the total vehicle (all aspects of vehicle design) and for an inter-national market. Key topics include design guidelines, crash investigation and statistics, driving performance measures, vehicle dynamics, occupant packaging, and driver vision.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

IOE 534 (BIOMEDE 534) (MFG 534): Occupational Biomechanics
Anatomical and physiological concepts are introduced to understand and predict human motor capabilities, with particular emphasis on the evaluation and design of manual activities in various occupations. Quantitative models are developed to explain: (1) muscle strength performance; (2) cumulative and acute musculoskeletal injury; (3) physical fatigue; and (4) human motion control.

Credits: 3

Winter 2020

IOE 837: Seminar in Occupational Health and Safety Engineering
This seminar provides an opportunity for graduate students interested in occupational health and safety engineering problems to become acquainted with various related contemporary research and professional activities, as presented by both staff and guest speakers.

Credits: 1

Winter 2020

ENGR 599: Special Topics in Engineering (Topic: NG Opioid Project)
Multidisciplinary Design Program Course –Special topics in interdisciplinary engineering

Credits: 1-4

Fall 2019

    U-M Law School

LAW 741-002 (EAS 731, ECON 741, EDUC 717, PUBHLTH 741, PUBPOL 710, SI 605, SW 741-001): Interdisciplinary Problem Solving (Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect)

This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). In Michigan, many children are subject to formal child abuse and neglect investigations, and those children are at high risk of subsequent maltreatment, poor school performance, foster care placement, and other adverse life outcomes. Multidisciplinary teams of students will develop tools to identify at-risk children, mitigate risks of maltreatment and removal from the home, and engage with at-risk families. Students will incorporate evidence and ideas from education, law, health sciences, public policy, social work, information, and other fields to develop innovative solutions. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students.

Credits: 3

Fall 2019

LAW 741-002 (EAS 731, ECON 741, EDUC 717, HS 741, PUBHLTH 741, PUBPOL 710, SI 605, SW 741-001): Interdisciplinary Problem Solving ( Campus Sexual Misconduct: Prevention and Response)

This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). In this class, multidisciplinary teams of students will explore solutions to campus sexual misconduct, drawing on knowledge and expertise from law, nursing, public policy, social work, public health, sociology, education, organizational studies, and other disciplines to develop a novel solution to the problem. In this course, we will explore topics such as the dynamics of campus sexual misconduct, research on its prevalence, its complex legal context, potential physical and psychological health issues experienced by students, the current status of campus policies, related professional ethics issues, and the impact of social identity (such as gender, race, LGBTQ+, class, and age). With this broad background, we will focus on some of the most vexing issues in this field through our interdisciplinary lens to make findings and recommendations that will form the basis of a capstone experience at the end of the term.

Credits: 3

Winter 2020

   U-M School of Nursing

HS 404 (WOMENSTD 404): Gender-Based Violence – From Theory to Action

This course examines gender based violence and the skills necessary to provide advocacy services to survivors. This course will introduce students to the roots of gender based violence, the social and cultural context in which it occurs, the mental and physical health impacts, justice and restitution frameworks, and will explore approaches to changing those structures in order to reduce or end it. Students will develop the skills to think critically about the local and global impact of gender based violence, how it intersects with other forms of oppression, and to develop an understanding of these issues that will be useful intellectually, personally, and professionally.

Credits: 2-3

Winter 2020

   U-M School of Kinesiology

KINESLGY 413-001 (MOVESCI 413-001): Special Topics in Movement Science

New experimental course in Movement Science. Course description is available from instructor.

Topic: Concussion in Sport  

Credits: 3

Winter 2020