Injury Courses at the University of Michigan


Trainees in the region interested in pursuing a career/vocation in injury prevention may choose from a broad array of courses to develop their knowledge and skills.  University of Michigan’s support for injury education is vast, with significant educational and training resources.  Below you will find a listing of injury-related graduate-level courses currently available at the University of Michigan. This list is updated continually, and we will add more courses as we move forward.  Please contact us if you know of any courses we should add to the list.

GRADUATE COURSES

 U-M School of Public Health

EHS 556: Occupational Ergonomics

Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.

Credits: 2

Fall 2020

EHS 652: Evaluation of Chemical Hazards

Concepts and techniques related to the evaluation of occupational exposures to gases, vapors, and aerosols. Emphasis on operating mechanisms and practical aspects of industrial hygiene air-monitoring equipment, characterizing exposure distributions, and developing sampling strategies. Lectures, laboratory exercises, demonstrations, problems, technical reports, and reading. Primarily for students in occupational health and safety. Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in biostatistics course.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

EHS 658: Physical Hazards

Lectures, discussions, demonstrations on the health effects, measurements methods, regulations, and control technologies related to physical hazards, including temperature extremes, noise, vibration, lasers, non-ionizing radiation (rf, microwave, IR, visible, and UV), and ionizing radiation. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Perm. Instr.

Credits: 2

Fall 2020

HMP 615: Introduction to Public Health Policy

This course gives introduction to the public health systems and policy issues public health systems practitioners face. Overview of public health policy interventions, theoretical motivations, influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environments in which policy decisions are made, and population health consequences of such decisions.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

HMP 693: Mental Health Policy in the United States

Students in this course will analyze mental health policies in the U.S. The class will meet once a week and have an interactive seminar format. We will approach various topics from both descriptive and analytical perspectives. Examples of topics include mental health insurance parity, the integration of mental health services and other health services, delivery of services in schools, delivery of services in prisons, and incentives influencing the balance between medication and therapy.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

 U-M School of Social Work

SW 540: Trauma Basics

The course will provide basic foundational knowledge from trauma research and practitioners’ expertise about the adverse cognitive, social-emotional, behavioral, and health outcomes on children and youth who experience trauma. The course will incorporate principles of interprofessional education, which focuses on helping students in the professions work collaboratively in generalist and specialty practice roles. Students will prepare for interprofessional and team-based approaches to prevention and intervention strategies in schools and other systems that serve children and families. A key focus will be applying new knowledge about trauma to better perceive trauma’s effects on children in the school setting and to develop strategies to assess their trauma-related needs, making use of teacher, social worker, and nurse roles.

Credits: 1

Fall 2020

SW 541: Trauma-Informed Practice

This course will provide foundational knowledge about trauma-informed practice. A primary goal is preparing students for interprofessional approaches to trauma-informed prevention and intervention. A key focus will be on teachers, social workers, and nurses collaborating to use specific trauma-informed practices for addressing young people’s academic, social-emotional, behavioral, and health needs. Enforced Pre-Requisite: EDUC 540 (SW/HS 540).

Credits: 1

Fall 2020

SW 618: Research-Informed Practices to Prevent Substance Abuse in Racial and Ethnic Minority Adolescents

This course will draw from multiple disciplines, including social work, epidemiology, public health, psychology, policy and couple and family therapy, to introduce students to theory and knowledge on substance abuse to inform social work practice with racial and ethnic minority adolescents in urban settings. This course will be guided by models, and the theoretical frameworks which inform them, that have been shown to be efficacious or effective in prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation of substance abuse in adolescents. Therefore, students will be introduced to research-informed substance abuse practices among racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents. For the purposes of this course, substance abuse will include both licit and illicit substances. Students will be asked to demonstrate the ways in which to apply research-informed theory and knowledge in practice settings with racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

SW 701: Current Treatment for Trauma Survivors

Among adults seeking treatment for behavioral health concerns, including mental health and substance use disorders, the high prevalence of historical trauma and associated PTSD is increasingly well-established. The results of the significant Adverse Childhood Experiences Study only emphasize further the high cost in negative health outcomes of neglecting to identify and treat the impact of childhood traumatic experiences. But what can be done to address this important co-occurring condition that otherwise poses such a threat to physical, emotional and mental health? This training will take participants through the steps of clinical treatment sequence that includes evidence-based best practices, from engagement with understandably ambivalent clients to available, research-based group and individual treatments. Use of the most recent version of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist (PCL-5) for client education, diagnostic assessment, treatment planning considerations, and outcome measurement will be featured. The groupwork modalities of Seeking Safety and the Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (TREM/M-TREM) will be presented, as well as individual therapy approaches including Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Cognitive Behavioral approaches, and Prolonged Exposure Therapy. Participants will be equipped with information, resources, and beginning skills that can lead to actionable change in the direction of improving the effectiveness of treatment for PTS/D across various service settings, from community mental health clinics, to substance use disorder treatment programs, to integrated primary care and behavioral health centers.

Credits: 1

Fall 2020

SW 739: Integrative Seminar: Child Maltreatment

This integrative seminar will integrate micro and macro levels of practice; research in child welfare and related fields, as the research relates to all levels of practice; the relationship of child maltreatment and other social problems; and perspectives from several disciplines, specifically social work, other mental health professions, law, and medicine, as these disciplines address problems of child maltreatment and child welfare. The seminar will highlight issues of social justice, disproportionality-particularly the over-representation of children and families of color in the child welfare system, and diverse populations, include children in general and poor children in particular. Prerequisites: Children & Youth Concentration or instructor’s permission.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

SW 862: Categorical Data Analysis

Researchers are most commonly aware of methods that are suitable for continuous dependent variables (e.g. mental health scores), such as the use of ordinary least squares regression. However many outcomes of interest to social workers, and other social researchers, are decidedly not continuous, but are dichotomous or binary in nature: entered the program versus did not enter the program; left the program versus stayed in the program; received a particular diagnosis; did not receive a diagnosis. Many researchers are familiar with the basics of logistic regression, yet do not have a grounding in some of the intricacies of logistic regression, such as generating predicted probabilities, or using interaction terms in a categorical model, which can lead to clearer and more accurate reporting of results. Further, the basic logistic regression model serves as the foundation for a wide variety of more advanced statistical approaches that can help advance social work research. Study of the logistic regression model can lead to variations of logistic regression such as logistic regression for ordered variables, or multinomial logistic regression where are more than two categories of the outcome variable (e.g. multiple forms of family violence). An understanding of logistic regression also helps to motivate understanding of models for censored data, such as the tobit model (useful. in studies of income and wealth), along with models for count data such as the Poisson and negative binomial model suitable for studying counts of events such as incidence of disease or incidence of violence. Lastly, categorical data model serve as the foundation for event history models that are used to study the timing of events, such as the timing of program entry, program departure, or receipt of a diagnosis.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

 

    U-M Law School

LAW 478: Policing and Public Safety

This seminar will examine what constitutes public safety and what are the most effective ways to achieve it. We will look at the vast responsibility and discretion afforded police in responding to and addressing crime and the fear crime. We will discuss issues such as police legitimacy, police integrity, the use of force, and other related issues. We will also look at the role of the community and other stakeholders in achieving public safety. We will use legal scholarship, social science research, case law, news clippings and legislative responses to examine this complex area. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 2

Fall 2020

LAW 795: Crimes Against Vulnerable Communities

This course examines the use of the criminal justice system to protect some of the most vulnerable groups in American society. We will focus on legal, policy and practical issues relating to the enforcement of these laws. Areas of exploration will include hate crimes, police misconduct, human trafficking, involuntary servitude, child exploitation, and domestic violence.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

LAW 910: Child Advocacy Clinic

The Child Advocacy Law Clinic provides students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary experience in problems of child abuse and neglect and of children in foster care. The clinic represents parents in one Michigan county, children in another, and the Michigan Child Protection Agency in six counties all in specific child maltreatment and termination of parental rights cases. With close support and supervision of an interdisciplinary faculty, the law student addresses the complex legal, social, emotional, ethical, and public policy questions of when and how the state ought to intervene in family life on behalf of children. Law students will work with practicing professionals, faculty, and students from social work, psychology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic seeks to introduce students to their new lawyer identity, the substantive and skill demands of this new role, and the institutional framework within which lawyers operate. The Clinic especially focuses on the relationship between the lawyer and other professionals facing the same social problem. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. Students are asked to integrate legal theory with real human crises in the cases they handle. Students will develop habits of thought and standards of performance and learn how to learn from raw experience for their future professional growth. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

LAW 911: Child Advocacy Clinic Seminar

Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

LAW 958: Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC)

The Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC) is one of the first medical-legal partnerships to be based in a law school setting. Through this partnership, students are able to reach families most in need of legal assistance and become part of an interdisciplinary team working to improve child health. Casework includes domestic violence and family law, special education, Medicaid appeals, and low-income housing conditions. Students in the clinic take “first chair” responsibility for their cases and are involved in all aspects of a case. They learn a range of advocacy skills, from preventive legal advocacy (focusing on identifying issues at an early stage and on developing creative, multidisciplinary approaches to addressing them) to traditional litigation skills in both administrative and trial court settings. The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement.
The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

LAW 959: Pediatric Advocacy Clinic Seminar

The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

   U-M School of Nursing

HS 695: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Trauma: A Special Topics Course

This transdisciplinary course welcomes students from any discipline. It provides far-ranging views of core concepts for understanding and responding to mitigate adverse effects of trauma exposures on individuals, families, groups, and populations and to promote resilience, recovery, and posttraumatic growth. The over-arching goal is to acquaint students with rich perspectives on trauma across health and social sciences, humanities, and practice disciplines to inform their capacity to respond to trauma as citizens, professionals, and scholars.
Students from all U-M Schools and Colleges are welcome. Readings and assignment topics can be selected to meet program requirements. Graduate and undergraduate students meet together but complete level-appropriate assignments. No pre-requisites.

Credits: 1-4

Fall 2020

   U-M School Of Public Policy

PUBPOL 534: The Economics of Developing Countries

This course surveys what we do and don?t know about economic growth and poverty alleviation in developing countries. We will cover the following topics in detail; the definition of development; the theory of economic growth; human capital (education and health); technology and innovation; economic policy; economic shocks; institutions; geography; and social conflict, violence, and war. In addition, we will discuss program evaluation (with a focus on educational interventions) and sustainable development (with a focus on microfinance). The course also includes two in-class debates related to the paper assignments. Advisory Pre-Requisite: Permission of Instructor.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

PUBPOL 717: Social Activism

Social Activism, Democracy, and Globalization from the Perspective of the Global South — How are the inherent and intersecting relations of power including inherent structures of dominance related to the experience of violence, oppression and resistance textured into the context of politics and policy making? This course investigates how multifaceted historical relationships of traumatic experience including Colonization, Slavery and Apartheid can be related to the ways in which we think about policy. This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to how the production of culture, ecology, psychology, law, economics and politics frames the sociology and historiography of the policymaking context. This course provides the opportunity for student’s to improve their analytical abilities. Whilst the material content used in this course will have a global focus local issues will also be considered. Seminar required.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

 U-M School of Public Health

PUBHLTH 414: Population Approaches to Mental Health

Overview of population mental health in the US context. Case-examples (autism, depression, substance use, etc.) will be used to illustrate social patterning, issues of nosology and measurement, and mental health treatment/services. Students will consider how social stigma impacts assessment and services for mental health conditions through readings the course project. Advisory Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in an introductory course in psychology/sociology and in an introductory quantitative science course (statistics, mathematics, physics, etc.).

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

   U-M School of Kinesiology

AT 300: Clinical Experience in Athletic Training C

This experience is designed to expose the student to experiences common to the practice of athletic training and to allow the student to demonstrate clinical proficiency in the areas of injury prevention, assessment, and management. Instructor Consent Required. Advisory Pre-Requisite: AT MAJ/SO STD.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

   U-M School of Education

EDUC 450: Education, Peace and Conflict

This course centers on the ways in which educational systems contribute to conflict and division, as well as to post-conflict reconstruction and stability. We will cover theories of conflict, peacebuilding, and justice frameworks. Through global case studies, we will examine the relationship between education, identity, poverty, and violence.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

   U-M School of Nursing

HS 404: Gender Based Violence: From Theory to Action

In this course we will examine gender based violence and the skills necessary to provide advocacy services to survivors. This course will introduce students to the roots of gender based violence, the social and cultural context in which it occurs, the mental and physical health impacts, justice and restitution frameworks, and will explore approaches to changing those structures in order to reduce or end it. Students will develop the skills to think critically about the local and global impact of gender based violence, how it intersects with other forms of oppression, and to develop an understanding of these issues that will be useful intellectually, personally, and professionally.

Credits: 2-3

Fall 2020

HS 495: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Trauma: A Special Topics Course

This transdisciplinary course welcomes students from any discipline. It provides far-ranging views of core concepts for understanding and responding to mitigate adverse effects of trauma exposures on individuals, families, groups, and populations and to promote resilience, recovery, and posttraumatic growth. The over-arching goal is to acquaint students with rich perspectives on trauma across health and social sciences, humanities, and practice disciplines to inform their capacity to respond to trauma as citizens, professionals, and scholars.
Students from all U-M Schools and Colleges are welcome. Readings and assignment topics can be selected to meet program requirements. Graduate and undergraduate students meet together but complete level-appropriate assignments. No pre-requisites.

Credits: 1-4

Fall 2020

NURS 220: Perspectives in Women’s Health

A feminist perspective on concepts and issues in women’s individual and aggregate health. Course will include definitions of women’s health, women’s health concerns, and impact of multiple factors on health. Topics covered will range from physiology of menstruation, sexuality, violence, disability, body image, mental health, reproductive control, childbirth to various constructions of health and disease across the lifespan. Constructions of gender and health and their intersections of social, racial, ethnic and political aspects will be considered.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

   U-M College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

HISTORY 305: American Addictions

Our subject is addiction. What is it? Why does it matter? This course explores how certain kinds of behavior (and people) have been studied, understood, and treated under the rubric of “addiction” in the United States. We will focus on how theories of addiction and its treatment have embodied different views of personhood, agency, and ethics. One aim of the course is to combine humanistic and scientific ways of thinking, including through individual and collaborative writing projects that bring past and present understandings of addictive substances and behaviors into conversation. This approach is essential to grappling with the political, philosophical, and personal consequences of how we study and stigmatize particular ways of life. Our focus on crucial texts in the history of science and medicine means that we will engage with technical material from psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience, while our approach to this work will draw on methods from across the humanities. Given recent and ongoing events surrounding opioid use and dependency as well as the intersections of race, gender, and class with addiction and its treatment, we will consistently return to the uses of history in the present.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

PHIL 355: Contemporary Moral Problems

The purpose of this course is to explore the moral issues confronting us in our daily lives and in our special disciplines. The topics discussed may include abortion, sex and sexual perversion, drugs, death and suicide, civil disobedience, punishment, pacifism, war, problems in medical ethics (eugenics, euthanasia, sanctity of life, organ transplants, defining death), environmental ethics, and the ethics of scientific research.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

PSYCH 321: American Addictions

Our subject is addiction. What is it? Why does it matter? This course explores how certain kinds of behavior (and people) have been studied, understood, and treated under the rubric of “addiction” in the United States. We will focus on how theories of addiction and its treatment have embodied different views of personhood, agency, and ethics. One aim of the course is to combine humanistic and scientific ways of thinking, including through individual and collaborative writing projects that bring past and present understandings of addictive substances and behaviors into conversation. This approach is essential to grappling with the political, philosophical, and personal consequences of how we study and stigmatize particular ways of life. Our focus on crucial texts in the history of science and medicine means that we will engage with technical material from psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience, while our approach to this work will draw on methods from across the humanities. Given recent and ongoing events surrounding opioid use and dependency as well as the intersections of race, gender, and class with addiction and its treatment, we will consistently return to the uses of history in the present.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

PSYCH 477: Current Topics in Clinical Psychology (Section: 001 Neural, Genetic, and Environmental Contributions to Psychopathy, Violence, and Aggression across the Lifespan)

This course explores the development and manifestation of antisocial behavior including psychopathy, aggression, and violence. At its core, this course examines what increases the risk that children will develop behavior problems and go onto to more chronic and extreme forms of violence and psychopathic personality that results in harm to others. We will examine psychiatric diagnoses associated with these antisocial behaviors in both childhood and adulthood and how they link to other relevant behaviors (e.g., substance use, ADHD). We will explore research elucidating the neural correlates of these behaviors, potential genetic mechanisms underlying these behaviors, and the environments that increase risk for these behaviors. Thus, there will be a focus on neurobiology and genetics approaches to psychiatric outcomes, as well as a social science approach to understanding these harmful behaviors, all while considering development across time. We will also consider ethical and moral implications of this research.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

RELIGION 305: Religion & Violence

Religion and Violence in the Secular World — How do we think about religion and violence in a secular world? Through a series of case studies focusing on the world’s major religious traditions including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Sikhism and Buddhism, this course reflects on a variety of contemporary themes including the War on Terror, religious pluralism, the fate of liberal democracy etc.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

SOC 208: Terrorism, Torture, and Violence

Terrorism, Torture, and Violence — This course analyzes contemporary trajectories of violence in three parts, starting with the analysis of terrorism, continuing with torture and ending with campus sexual assault. It thus traces violence from the macro to the micro level.

Credits: 4

Fall 2020

WGS 220: Perspectives in Women’s Health

A feminist perspective on concepts and issues in women’s individual and aggregate health. Course will include definitions of women’s health, women’s health concerns, and impact of multiple factors on health. Topics covered will range from physiology of menstruation, sexuality, violence, disability, body image, mental health, reproductive control, childbirth to various constructions of health and disease across the lifespan. Constructions of gender and health and their intersections of social, racial, ethnic and political aspects will be considered.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

WGS 322: Black Feminist Health

Black Feminist Approaches to Health — This course examines black women’s health, longevity, and well-being from a black feminist perspective and focuses on how the interlocking systems of racism, poverty, violence, and sexism influence the embodied health experiences of black women. We will survey black feminist and proto-feminist coping strategies of historical and contemporary health crises. Advisory Pre-Requisite: WGS/AMCULT 240 (WOMENSTD/AMCULT 240) Intro to Women’s Studies or WGS/NURS 220 (WOMENSTD/NURS 220) Perspectives in Women’s Health or WGS 250 (WOMENSTD 250) Race, Gender and Nation.

Credits: 3

Fall 2020

WGS 345: Topic Gender Global (Section: 001 Sexual Violence and the State)

This course examines, through a comparative, transnational, and intersectional feminist lens, the complex relationship(s) between sexual violence and the state under differing historical contexts and in diverse geographical locations. We will interrogate the colonial and the postcolonial, “first” and “third” worlds, text and context. Tracing how gender intersects with race, religion, nation, social class, and sexuality, we will frame sexual violence as simultaneously personal and political as we critically examine the political, cultural, legal, regulatory and discursive roles of the state. Advisory Prerequisites: WGS/AMCULT 240 (WOMENSTD/AMCULT 240).

Credits: 3

Fall 2020