Injury Courses at the University of Michigan


Trainees in the region interested in pursuing a career/vocation in injury prevention may choose from a broad array of courses to develop their knowledge and skills.  University of Michigan’s support for injury education is vast, with significant educational and training resources.  Below you will find a listing of injury-related graduate-level courses currently available at the University of Michigan. This list is updated continually, and we will add more courses as we move forward.  Please contact us if you know of any courses we should add to the list.

GRADUATE COURSES

 U-M School of Public Health

EHS 652: Evaluation of Chemical Hazards

Concepts and techniques related to the evaluation of occupational exposures to gases, vapors, and aerosols. Emphasis on operating mechanisms and practical aspects of industrial hygiene air-monitoring equipment, characterizing exposure distributions, and developing sampling strategies. Lectures, laboratory exercises, demonstrations, problems, technical reports, and reading. Primarily for students in occupational health and safety. Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in biostatistics course.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

EHS 658: Physical Hazards

Lectures, discussions, demonstrations on the health effects, measurements methods, regulations, and control technologies related to physical hazards, including temperature extremes, noise, vibration, lasers, non-ionizing radiation (rf, microwave, IR, visible, and UV), and ionizing radiation. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Perm. Instr.

Credits: 2

Fall 2021

HBEHED 659: Introduction to Adolescent Substance Use Prevention

Students gain an overview of adolescent substance use prevention form a public health perspective. Students learn about the evidence-base on adolescent substance use prevention. They apply course content to create prevention interventions. The course examines both illicit (e.g., opiates, marijuana, methamphetamine) and licit (e.g., alcohol tobacco) substances.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

HBEHED 677: Health Impacts of Immigration Law Enforcement and Policy in the U.S.

This course draws on the social-ecological model to consider the multi-level health impacts of immigration law enforcement on individuals, families and communities; the similarities between immigration enforcement conducted by ICE and law enforcement conducted by police; and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Empirical data, articles, books, and media will be used to catalyze discussion and analysis of how immigration law enforcement impacts mixed-status communities throughout the U.S. Through interactions with those who conducted and lived through law enforcement activities and the advocates and researchers who respond to enforcement, students will better understand the ways in which fear of state violence shapes health and health seeking behaviors throughout the community and contributes to racial health inequities.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

HBHE 710: Race, Ethnicity, & Mental Health

Special Topic — Master’s level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion, and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

HMP 615: Introduction to Public Health Policy

This course gives introduction to the public health systems and policy issues public health systems practitioners face. Overview of public health policy interventions, theoretical motivations, influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environments in which policy decisions are made, and population health consequences of such decisions.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

HMP 653: Law and Public Health

The purpose of this course is to examine the legal context of the relationship the individual and the community, and to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: constitutional authority and limits on governmental intervention in public health (i.e., individual rights vs. society’s rights); the function of the interactions between courts, legislatures, and regulators; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in public health positions; how to recognize legal result and communicate with attorneys; and the process of public health regulation and potential legal barriers to public health intervention strategies. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include; the nature and scope of public health authority; constitutional constraints on public health initiatives; tobacco control; youth violence; injury prevention; the spread of communicable disease; and regulating environmental risk.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

EPID 617: Social Epidemiology II: Social and Economic Determinants of Population Health

The objective of this course is to examine, in depth, some of the key social determinants of health in populations. The course is organized around substantive topics areas (e.g. obesity, disability, mental health, youth and substance abuse, stress and social support, neighborhoods and environments), with a focus on understanding the role of social factors in shaping health. The course draws heavily on epidemiological perspectives and methods as tools to improve our understanding of population health, and is designed to expose students to different methodological approaches and their strengths/limitations in defining population health, understanding its determinants, and assessing the mechanisms by which these determinants influence population health.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

EPID 679: Epidemiology of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

Introduces the epidemiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. Addresses conceptual and methodological considerations in psychiatric research, descriptive and analytic epidemiology of common psychiatric and substance use disorders, and issues of classification and measurement for epidemiologic research. Students analyze epidemiologic data pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

 U-M School of Social Work

SW 540: Trauma Basics

This course is a  workshop-based inter-professional education course offered by the School of Social Work in partnership with the School of Nursing and School of Education. It is the first course in a 3-course sequence in Trauma-Informed Practice (TIP). This first course  will provide basic, foundational knowledge about the cognitive, social-emotional, behavioral, and health-related outcomes of trauma in children. A key focus of the course will be on enhancing awareness of trauma in children; assessing and responding to the needs of children who encounter trauma; and changing systems to become more responsive to vulnerable children and their families. Exploration of factors known to promote resilience and well-being will be emphasized and examined throughout the course. The course will examine principles of interprofessional education, which focuses on helping students in the professions of social work, nursing, and education work collaboratively in generalist and specialty practice roles. This course is available only to Social Work, Nursing, and Education students. SW students must enroll under SW 540. Nursing students under HS 540; Education students under EDUC 540.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 541: Trauma-Informed Practice

This course will provide foundational knowledge about trauma-informed practice. A primary goal is preparing students for interprofessional approaches to trauma-informed prevention and intervention. A key focus will be on teachers, social workers, and nurses collaborating to use specific trauma-informed practices for addressing young people’s academic, social-emotional, behavioral, and health needs. Enforced Pre-Requisite: EDUC 540 (SW/HS 540).

Credits: 1

Fall 2021

SW 601: Applied Assessment Skills in Integrated Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse

This course focuses on further developing and deepening skills and competencies to conduct brief, evidence-based and evidence informed developmentally appropriate assessment and screening for common health, mental health, substance use and other behavioral health concerns which impact and/or compromise health. Examples include screening and assessment for risky, harmful or dependent use of substances; cognitive impairment; mental health problems; adjustment to illness, behaviors that compromise health; harm to self or others; and abuse, neglect, and domestic violence, etc.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 602: Interpersonal Practice Interventions in Integrated Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse (Adults)

The course will build on intervention therapy and practice from the foundation semester and promote more advanced intervention skill level of engagement, contracting, use of evidence based, evidence informed interventions and termination/evaluation phases. Particular focus will be on advanced clinical competency development regarding: 1. Behavioral activation, 2. Cognitive restructuring, 3. Managing resistance, 4. Emotional Regulation, 5. Functional Analysis, 6. Problem solving Interventions and 7. Chronic Distress Tolerance. This course focuses on skill building to provide a range of brief, evidence-based and/or evidence -informed interventions including prevention, treatment and recovery as well as longer-term treatment and support for clients as appropriate. Examples include: motivational interventions; brief treatments for mental health and substance use problems; adjustment to illness, crisis intervention, and chronic illness management. This course will have adult-focused sections and children-focused section and interventions covered may be adapted to meet the needs of specific population focus.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 603: Interpersonal Practice Interventions in Integrated Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse (Children, Youth, Transitional Youth, and Families)

This course will build on intervention approaches introduced in the essential courses and will promote more advanced engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation skills in work with children, youth, transitional age youth, and families. Special attention will be given to issues of diversity as it relates to building therapeutic relationships and intervening with children, youth, transitional age youth, and their families.
This course focuses on advanced skill building regarding core practice interventions (e.g. engagement, contracting, problem-solving, emotional regulation, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, etc.) using specific brief, evidence-based and/or evidence-informed interventions including prevention, treatment and recovery as well as longer-term treatment and support for these children and youth as appropriate. Examples of practice interventions may include: behavioral/cognitive interventions, motivational interventions; resiliency based interventions, brief treatments for mental health and substance use problems, crisis intervention, parent management interventions, and group interventions. Intervention strategies will be analyzed in the context of delivering trauma-informed culturally responsive interventions.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 607: Advanced Interventions with Substance Abuse Disorders

This course targets students who elect to learn more about chemical dependency and other addictive behaviors. Course content and instructional methodologies that are used to enable students to develop knowledge and practice skills in areas of prevention and client intervention of chemical abuse and other addictive behaviors. The course uses a framework for student understanding that addresses chemical abuse and other addictive behaviors based on both theoretical and science-based prevention and intervention approaches.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

SW 612: Mental Health and Mental Disorders of Children and Youth

This interprofessional course is for student learners in the areas of social work, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and education. This course will present the state-of-the-art knowledge and research on mental disorders of children and youth, as well as factors that promote mental health, and prevent mental disorders and substance related problems in children and youth. Using a clinical case discussion format, this class will highlight mental health diagnoses, comorbidity, and collaboration across health professions. Social determinants of health/mental health will be used as an organizing framework for discussing the impact of factors associated with health and mental health across diverse cultures, groups and populations.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 618: Research-Informed Practices to Prevent Substance Abuse in Racial and Ethnic Minority Adolescents

This course will draw from multiple disciplines, including social work, epidemiology, public health, psychology, policy and couple and family therapy, to introduce students to theory and knowledge on substance abuse to inform social work practice with racial and ethnic minority adolescents in urban settings. This course will be guided by models, and the theoretical frameworks which inform them, that have been shown to be efficacious or effective in prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation of substance abuse in adolescents. Therefore, students will be introduced to research-informed substance abuse practices among racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents. For the purposes of this course, substance abuse will include both licit and illicit substances. Students will be asked to demonstrate the ways in which to apply research-informed theory and knowledge in practice settings with racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

SW 621: Culturally Responsive and Evidence-Informed Assessment with Children, Youth, and Families

This course is intended to develop knowledge and skills for practice with children, youth and families, with special attention to assessment. Students learn about varying approaches to assessment, the various contexts in which assessment takes place, and the assessment skills used with children, youth, and families. Students will be familiar with both strengths and limitations of assessments, and how assessments are used (e.g., in school, juvenile justice, and child welfare forensic assessment) including assessments for intervention recommendations. Students will learn how to evaluate overall functioning, conduct developmental assessments, and make a determination about child, youth and family service needs. Students will learn different models of assessment and the role of interdisciplinary assessments (e.g., medical examinations and psychological testing) in the overall assessment process. Students will also become acquainted with widely used assessment practices with children, youth and families in terms of initial screening, risk assessment, and structured decision making. Existing evidence for their utility will be explored. Students will also be sensitized to their personal reaction to child and youth demonstrations of trauma and crises. They will be appraised of professional expectations, such as mandatory reporting of child maltreatment, and will learn about the general structure of service delivery to child and youth clients. Sensitization to the roles of power and privilege of professionals as they relate to both children and their parents is an integral part of the course. In addition, the course will address the sometimes conflicting needs of children and families and child-serving systems (e.g., legal system; school) impacting assessment outcomes and recommendations. The diversity of children, youth and families, in terms of race, ethnicity, culture, class, sexual orientation, religion, ability, and other social identities will be explored. Of particular focus is the over-representation of children of color and the differential response of various child and youth serving systems based upon social identity differences. Students will gain insights about how differences between themselves and client systems affect assessment process including outcomes and recommendations. Advisory Pre-Requisite: Foundation Essentials required.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 624: Child Maltreatment Assessment and Treatment

This course will cover the following areas: 1) personal, professional, and societal responses to children at risk for maltreatment, 2) diversity in the child welfare population and skills for working with diverse client populations, 3) client issues and responses to child welfare intervention, including power differentials and involuntariness, 4) theories that explain child maltreatment and their social construction, 5) assessment strategies to be used with children and adults with child welfare issues, 6) interventions employed in the child welfare system and the evidence or lack thereof to support them, and 7) evidence-based treatment strategies used with traumatized children. This course will focus upon practice issues, especially poverty and parental problems in families in the United States, Canada, and Western Europe.

Credits: 1

Fall 2021

SW 627: Child Welfare System

This course will focus on the evolution and development of child protection in the United States. The goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of how state governments think about the adequacy/appropriateness of parenting, the safety of children, when and how child protection agencies get involved with families and what the evidence says about such involvement. We will discuss the origins and implementation of major child welfare policies and we will review practice innovations and some of the most pressing challenges facing child welfare systems today. A common theme throughout the course will be the intersection of child welfare and poverty, race, gender, identity and trauma. The course will cover policies and practices from both micro and macro perspectives and students will learn how child welfare systems collaborate (or at times fail to collaborate) with other allied systems of care (e.g. community mental health, juvenile justice, substance abuse).

Credits: 1

Winter 2021

SW 637: Integrated Health Care Policy and Services

This course will examine the integration of policies, financing, organization and delivery of physical health and behavioral health (mental health and substance abuse) care services and programs for adults, youth and children. The primary focus of study will be the U.S. health care system, with international comparisons, including promotion, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation services in primary care, acute care, chronic care, and long-term care settings. The evolution of the integration of primary care and behavioral health care services will constitute the focus of our policy analysis.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

SW 701: Current Treatment for Trauma Survivors

Among adults seeking treatment for behavioral health concerns, including mental health and substance use disorders, the high prevalence of historical trauma and associated PTSD is increasingly well-established. The results of the significant Adverse Childhood Experiences Study only emphasize further the high cost in negative health outcomes of neglecting to identify and treat the impact of childhood traumatic experiences. But what can be done to address this important co-occurring condition that otherwise poses such a threat to physical, emotional and mental health? This training will take participants through the steps of clinical treatment sequence that includes evidence-based best practices, from engagement with understandably ambivalent clients to available, research-based group and individual treatments. Use of the most recent version of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist (PCL-5) for client education, diagnostic assessment, treatment planning considerations, and outcome measurement will be featured. The groupwork modalities of Seeking Safety and the Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (TREM/M-TREM) will be presented, as well as individual therapy approaches including Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Cognitive Behavioral approaches, and Prolonged Exposure Therapy. Participants will be equipped with information, resources, and beginning skills that can lead to actionable change in the direction of improving the effectiveness of treatment for PTS/D across various service settings, from community mental health clinics, to substance use disorder treatment programs, to integrated primary care and behavioral health centers.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 704: Cultural Issues in the Delivery of OUD/SUD Treatment

In this mini course, students will explore cultural issues in the assessment and treatment of Opioid Use Disorders/Substance Use Disorders. Students will examine the effect of culture on the initiation, use, and abuse of substances. Socio-cultural beliefs can shape an individual’s approach to behavior regarding substance use and abuse. A special focus will be on emerging practices that support positive outcomes for diverse cultural groups, in prevention OUD/SUD, accessing services, engaging and completing treatment programs related to OUD/SUD.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021

SW 706: Neuroscience and Substance Abuse

Perhaps now more than ever, social work scientists and practitioners alike affirm the need to fully understand the variability of substance use behaviors, including substance misuse, abuse and dependence, from a multidisciplinary approach. However, the literature and practice with regard to substance use and neuroscience in the context of social work remain in its infancy. Neuroscience is concerned with better understanding brain function and structure across the lifespan, including the use of innovative methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. This mini-course will provide an introduction to substance use and neuroscience in the context of social work and cover topics such as the ethical and legal aspects in neuroscience, potential alterations in brain function (e.g., cognitive) and structure (e.g., D2 dopamine receptor) linked to substance use behaviors, gene x environment interaction (e.g., neurogenetics), and the developmental and cultural aspects of neuroscience. Developing a fuller understanding of the neuroscience-related mechanisms underlying substance use behaviors is promising with respect to advancing the etiology literature, which has the potential to lead to optimally efficacious and effective social work prevention and treatment programs.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

SW 707: Services and Supports to Transgender Clients and Communities

This course will increase students’ capacity to understand the issues faced by gender diverse people and communities, including but not limited to trans and nonbinary persons across the life span, and capacity to provide gender-affirming social work support to this group. To achieve these goals, this course will 1) offer a working definition of terms, including (but not limited to): Transgender, Gender Identity, Gender Expression, Gender Expansive, Gender Diverse, Intersex, Nonbinary, Cisgender, and Accomplice; 2) examine multiple risk factors that impact trans and gender diverse people (e.g., mental health issues, economic insecurity, violence) from a strengths-based lens; 3) examine protective factors (e.g., social support, community); 4) consider how these experiences are differentially experienced across intersections of race, class, and disability status, among other facets of identity/experience; and, 5) educate students about resources for trans and gender diverse individuals and communities and where/how to access these resources. Of particular importance, the concept of gender affirmation will be introduced, including mechanisms for social, legal, and medical gender affirmation, with examination of the role of the Social Worker in each of these domains.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021

SW 862: Categorical Data Analysis

Researchers are most commonly aware of methods that are suitable for continuous dependent variables (e.g. mental health scores), such as the use of ordinary least squares regression. However many outcomes of interest to social workers, and other social researchers, are decidedly not continuous, but are dichotomous or binary in nature: entered the program versus did not enter the program; left the program versus stayed in the program; received a particular diagnosis; did not receive a diagnosis. Many researchers are familiar with the basics of logistic regression, yet do not have a grounding in some of the intricacies of logistic regression, such as generating predicted probabilities, or using interaction terms in a categorical model, which can lead to clearer and more accurate reporting of results. Further, the basic logistic regression model serves as the foundation for a wide variety of more advanced statistical approaches that can help advance social work research. Study of the logistic regression model can lead to variations of logistic regression such as logistic regression for ordered variables, or multinomial logistic regression where are more than two categories of the outcome variable (e.g. multiple forms of family violence). An understanding of logistic regression also helps to motivate understanding of models for censored data, such as the tobit model (useful. in studies of income and wealth), along with models for count data such as the Poisson and negative binomial model suitable for studying counts of events such as incidence of disease or incidence of violence. Lastly, categorical data model serve as the foundation for event history models that are used to study the timing of events, such as the timing of program entry, program departure, or receipt of a diagnosis.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

    U-M Law School

LAW 673: Family Law

This course will provide an overview of contemporary family law. The course will cover constitutional questions such as the state’s power over private relations, access to marriage, gender equality, and the rights of parents to raise their children. It will examine marriage, non-marital families, economic rights and obligations, intra-family violence, parenthood including adoption, surrogacy and assisted reproductive technologies, divorce, child support, child custody and visitation, child protection and foster care, dispute resolution methods, and private agreements in family law (prenuptial and separation). We will address ethical issues and the practice of family law.
The course will consider the rapid trajectory of doctrinal and cultural change in modern family law and provide a foundation for understanding and participating in the ongoing evolution of the field. The course will include several practice-based exercises throughout the semester. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

LAW 795: Crimes Against Vulnerable Communities

This course examines the use of the criminal justice system to protect some of the most vulnerable groups in American society. We will focus on legal, policy and practical issues relating to the enforcement of these laws. Areas of exploration will include hate crimes, police misconduct, human trafficking, involuntary servitude, child exploitation, and domestic violence.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

LAW 910: Child Advocacy Clinic

The Child Advocacy Law Clinic provides students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary experience in problems of child abuse and neglect and of children in foster care. The clinic represents parents in one Michigan county, children in another, and the Michigan Child Protection Agency in six counties all in specific child maltreatment and termination of parental rights cases. With close support and supervision of an interdisciplinary faculty, the law student addresses the complex legal, social, emotional, ethical, and public policy questions of when and how the state ought to intervene in family life on behalf of children. Law students will work with practicing professionals, faculty, and students from social work, psychology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic seeks to introduce students to their new lawyer identity, the substantive and skill demands of this new role, and the institutional framework within which lawyers operate. The Clinic especially focuses on the relationship between the lawyer and other professionals facing the same social problem. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. Students are asked to integrate legal theory with real human crises in the cases they handle. Students will develop habits of thought and standards of performance and learn how to learn from raw experience for their future professional growth. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 4

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

LAW 911: Child Advocacy Clinic Seminar

Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

LAW 958: Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC)

The Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC) is one of the first medical-legal partnerships to be based in a law school setting. Through this partnership, students are able to reach families most in need of legal assistance and become part of an interdisciplinary team working to improve child health. Casework includes domestic violence and family law, special education, Medicaid appeals, and low-income housing conditions. Students in the clinic take “first chair” responsibility for their cases and are involved in all aspects of a case. They learn a range of advocacy skills, from preventive legal advocacy (focusing on identifying issues at an early stage and on developing creative, multidisciplinary approaches to addressing them) to traditional litigation skills in both administrative and trial court settings. The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement.
The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 4

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

LAW 959: Pediatric Advocacy Clinic Seminar

The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School’s professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Department Consent Required. Enforced Pre-Requisite: Law Professional.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

   U-M College of Engineering

IOE 534/BIOMEDE 534/MFG 534: Occupational Biomechanics

Anatomical and physiological concepts are introduced to understand and predict human motor capabilities, with particular emphasis on the evaluation and design of manual activities in various occupations. Quantitative models are developed to explain: (1) muscle strength performance; (2) cumulative and acute musculoskeletal injury; (3) physical fatigue; and (4) human motion control.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

IOE 539/MFG 539: Safety Engineering Methods

Recognition, evaluation, and control of generic safety hazards (confined spaces, electricity, fire, mechanical energy, etc.) found in contemporary workplaces, using case studies from manufacturing, transportation and power generation. Students perform an interdisciplinary team project using contemporary systems safety methods (e.g., fault tree analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, or job safety analysis) to redesign a work station or consumer product.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

IOE 837: Interprofessional Perspectives in Occupational Health and Safety

This seminar is to provide an opportunity for graduate students interested in occupational health and safety-engineering problems to become acquainted with various related contemporary research and professional activities, as presented by both staff and guest speakers.

Credits: 1

Winter 2021

   U-M School of Nursing

HS 695: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Trauma: A Special Topics Course

This transdisciplinary course welcomes students from any discipline. It provides far-ranging views of core concepts for understanding and responding to mitigate adverse effects of trauma exposures on individuals, families, groups, and populations and to promote resilience, recovery, and posttraumatic growth. The over-arching goal is to acquaint students with rich perspectives on trauma across health and social sciences, humanities, and practice disciplines to inform their capacity to respond to trauma as citizens, professionals, and scholars.
Students from all U-M Schools and Colleges are welcome. Readings and assignment topics can be selected to meet program requirements. Graduate and undergraduate students meet together but complete level-appropriate assignments. No pre-requisites. Click here for more information.

Credits: 1-4

Fall 2020

   U-M School Of Public Policy

PUBPOL 717: Social Activism

Social Activism, Democracy, and Globalization from the Perspective of the Global South — How are the inherent and intersecting relations of power including inherent structures of dominance related to the experience of violence, oppression and resistance textured into the context of politics and policy making? This course investigates how multifaceted historical relationships of traumatic experience including Colonization, Slavery and Apartheid can be related to the ways in which we think about policy. This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to how the production of culture, ecology, psychology, law, economics and politics frames the sociology and historiography of the policymaking context. This course provides the opportunity for student’s to improve their analytical abilities. Whilst the material content used in this course will have a global focus local issues will also be considered. Seminar required.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

 U-M School of Public Health

PUBHLTH 414: Population Approaches to Mental Health

Overview of population mental health in the US context. Case-examples (autism, depression, substance use, etc.) will be used to illustrate social patterning, issues of nosology and measurement, and mental health treatment/services. Students will consider how social stigma impacts assessment and services for mental health conditions through readings the course project. Advisory Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in an introductory course in psychology/sociology and in an introductory quantitative science course (statistics, mathematics, physics, etc.).

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

   U-M School of Kinesiology

AT 300: Clinical Experience in Athletic Training C

This experience is designed to expose the student to experiences common to the practice of athletic training and to allow the student to demonstrate clinical proficiency in the areas of injury prevention, assessment, and management. Instructor Consent Required. Advisory Pre-Requisite: AT MAJ/SO STD.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

AT 305: Clinical Experience in Athletic Training D

The experience is designed to expose the student to experience common to the practice of athletic training and to allow the student to demonstrate clinical proficiency in the areas of injury prevention, assessment, and management.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

MOVESCI 413 – 006/KINESLGY 413-006: Special Topics in Movement Science

Topic: Surg Neuroanat & Periop Injury. New experimental course in Movement Science. Course description is available from instructor.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

   U-M School of Education

EDUC 450: Education, Peace and Conflict

This course centers on the ways in which educational systems contribute to conflict and division, as well as to post-conflict reconstruction and stability. We will cover theories of conflict, peacebuilding, and justice frameworks. Through global case studies, we will examine the relationship between education, identity, poverty, and violence.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

   U-M School of Nursing

NURS 220: Perspectives in Women’s Health

A feminist perspective on concepts and issues in women’s individual and aggregate health. Course will include definitions of women’s health, women’s health concerns, and impact of multiple factors on health. Topics covered will range from physiology of menstruation, sexuality, violence, disability, body image, mental health, reproductive control, childbirth to various constructions of health and disease across the lifespan. Constructions of gender and health and their intersections of social, racial, ethnic and political aspects will be considered.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

PNE 301: Care of the Family: Reproductive Health Clinical

The primary focus of this clinical is to provide care to women and their families within the context of the developing family. Students will care for women in the prenatal, birthing, and postpartum periods. They will care for newborns and provide safe assessments and interventions. The relationships among pregnancy, birth, families, community, and culture will be explored within the clinical context. Students will examine issues such as prenatal loss, addiction and trauma. They will provide patient and family education to maximize the health of the woman, newborn and family.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

NURS 373: Behavioral Health

This theory course focuses on the influence of biology and the environment on people’s emotions, behavior, and cognition. The emphasis is on promotion of mental health and intervention with people who are experiencing behavioral, emotional, or cognitive difficulties. It incorporates psychological, emotional, biological, social and spiritual elements, including discussion of genetics and social determinants that impact mental health and mental illness. Students will examine how behavioral health issues are related to other conditions such as medical illnesses. Topics such as addition, stigma, and suicide are addressed. Importance is on learning skills to create meaningful relationships through communications, skills that promoter healthy functioning. Students will explore how families, communities, societies, and culture impact mental health and interventions.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

HS 404: Gender Based Violence: From Theory to Action

In this course we will examine gender based violence and the skills necessary to provide advocacy services to survivors. This course will introduce students to the roots of gender based violence, the social and cultural context in which it occurs, the mental and physical health impacts, justice and restitution frameworks, and will explore approaches to changing those structures in order to reduce or end it. Students will develop the skills to think critically about the local and global impact of gender based violence, how it intersects with other forms of oppression, and to develop an understanding of these issues that will be useful intellectually, personally, and professionally.

Credits: 2-3

Fall 2021

   U-M College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

HISTORY 305: American Addictions

Our subject is addiction. What is it? Why does it matter? This course explores how certain kinds of behavior (and people) have been studied, understood, and treated under the rubric of “addiction” in the United States. We will focus on how theories of addiction and its treatment have embodied different views of personhood, agency, and ethics. One aim of the course is to combine humanistic and scientific ways of thinking, including through individual and collaborative writing projects that bring past and present understandings of addictive substances and behaviors into conversation. This approach is essential to grappling with the political, philosophical, and personal consequences of how we study and stigmatize particular ways of life. Our focus on crucial texts in the history of science and medicine means that we will engage with technical material from psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience, while our approach to this work will draw on methods from across the humanities. Given recent and ongoing events surrounding opioid use and dependency as well as the intersections of race, gender, and class with addiction and its treatment, we will consistently return to the uses of history in the present.

Credits: 4

Fall 2021

PHIL 355: Contemporary Moral Problems

The purpose of this course is to explore the moral issues confronting us in our daily lives and in our special disciplines. The topics discussed may include abortion, sex and sexual perversion, drugs, death and suicide, civil disobedience, punishment, pacifism, war, problems in medical ethics (eugenics, euthanasia, sanctity of life, organ transplants, defining death), environmental ethics, and the ethics of scientific research.

Credits: 4

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

POLSCI 489 Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science (Section: 013 Political Violence in Africa)

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the study of political violence in Africa. The course specifically examines domestic or intra-state manifestations of violence through a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches. Over the course of the semester, we will see that violence is not something endemic to the continent; instead, we will investigate violence as the outcome of political and economic conditions and processes. To do so, we will consider specific events in African countries while also using social science concepts and methods to examine and explain broad patterns across the continent. In conducting this exploration, we will primarily rely on and build upon the work of political scientists, but will also draw on the contributions of journalists, anthropologists, psychologists, economists, and historians.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

POLSCI 489 Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science (Section: 001 Sexual Violence and War)/ INTLSTD 401 – International Studies Advanced Seminar (Section: 004 Sexual Violence and War)

Sexual violence occurs in many conflicts, and affects both women, men and children. The consequences of the violence can be detrimental to the survivors themselves, their families, and entire communities; and the effects can linger long after war has ended. Only recently has the international community recognized this type of violence as an international security issue. How and why did the international community start to take this issue seriously? How prevalent is conflict-related sexual violence globally? What are the causes and consequences of conflict-related sexual violence? How can we stop sexual violence, and help survivors? These are some of the key questions in this course. Sexual violence can be a particularly difficult topic to study due to the sensitive nature of the topic, which can create ethical dilemmas and practical challenges. We will discuss how we do research on sensitive or hidden phenomena in general, and how to evaluate and use different types of source material in the case of sexual violence in particular. The students will use this skill set to do a case study of a recent or ongoing conflict. Based on theories about causes of conflict-related sexual violence and existing data and findings, we will discuss what policies and prevention mechanisms could reduce or stop conflict-related sexual violence.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

POLSCI 489 Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science (Section: 005 Police Violence)

Within the last 10 years or so and especially in the last year it seems that police violence in the United States has become a huge problem. Is this the case, why is this the case, and what (if anything) can be done about it? This class is directed toward investigating these questions by viewing the topic both deeply as well as comparatively. We will consider a broad array of theoretical arguments as well as consider evidence from not just the US but across the globe. The class will involve some unique use of a newly available data source on police violence around the world from 1976 to 2016.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

Psych 120: First Year Seminar in Psychology (Section: 004 The Psychology of Violence)

This freshman seminar is focused on the study of violence. Using readings, lectures, clinical case presentations, films, and class discussions, we cover the range of psychological theories that can account for violence across the lifespan. The course begins with a discussion of a range of violence events and definitions of violence victimization and violence perpetration. Theoretical frameworks and models useful for understanding violence are introduced, including developmental psychopathology, cognitive development, neuropsychology, bio-behavioral theory, and intergenerational systems theory. Following the developmental psychopathology model, research on relevant risk and protective factors associated with violence is also presented. In addition, the evidence for best intervention practices in treating violence victims is examined.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

Psych 370: Topics in Clinical Psychology (Section: 002 Advanced Topics in Sexual and Gender Minority Mental Health)

 This course covers the history, theory, and research important for understanding sexual and gender minority (SGM) mental health and mental health challenges. The course will consist of a critical dive into the ways in which understanding of SGM mental health has changed over time.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

PSYCH 477: Inside the Criminal Mind (Section: 001 Neural, Genetic, and Environmental Contributions to Psychopathy, Violence, and Aggression across the Lifespan)

This course explores the development and manifestation of antisocial behavior including psychopathy, aggression, and violence. At its core, this course examines what increases the risk that children will develop behavior problems and go onto to more chronic and extreme forms of violence and psychopathic personality that results in harm to others. We will examine psychiatric diagnoses associated with these antisocial behaviors in both childhood and adulthood and how they link to other relevant behaviors (e.g., substance use, ADHD). We will explore research elucidating the neural correlates of these behaviors, potential genetic mechanisms underlying these behaviors, and the environments that increase risk for these behaviors. Thus, there will be a focus on neurobiology and genetics approaches to psychiatric outcomes, as well as a social science approach to understanding these harmful behaviors, all while considering development across time. We will also consider ethical and moral implications of this research.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

SOC 208: Terrorism, Torture, and Violence

Terrorism, Torture, and Violence — This course analyzes contemporary trajectories of violence in three parts, starting with the analysis of terrorism, continuing with torture and ending with campus sexual assault. It thus traces violence from the macro to the micro level.

Credits: 4

Fall 2021

SOC 495 Topics in Sociology (Section: 001 Drugs and Society)

The use of intoxicants is found in every known society and drug use is as old as it is widespread. Drugs serve medical, religious, recreational and many other functions. This course will attempt to explain the fascination humans have with intoxication. To do so, we will focus on drug use from a cross-cultural and historical perspective and center our attention on drug use within the context of various social institutions. The course is both empirical and theoretical. We will concern ourselves with the facts of drug use and then attempt to order these facts with testable theories. Overriding course themes illustrate how drugs are a social and political phenomenon, as well as a chemical one.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021

WGS 213: Topics in Gender and the Humanities (Section: 001 War, Gender, Masculinity, Violence)

This course explores “the puzzle of gendered war roles” by introducing concepts such as: combat masculinities, women and/in war, biology and combat, heroines and heroes, war and rape, warfare and civilian life, and war memories, among others. We draw on legendary military conflicts taking place before the advent of modern weaponry, involving, for example, the Amazons and the samurai, as well as exemplary modern wars. We also consider the meanings of representations of wars and fighters in tales, films, anime and games, including “Princess Mononoke,” “Saving Private Ryan,” “Black Panther,” “Captain Marvel,” ”The Wings of Eagles,” and “the Combined Fleet Girls Collection (Kancolle).” Students will gain a broad perspective about warfare, and an understanding of interrelationships between war and gender.

Credits: 4

Winter 2021

WGS 220: Perspectives in Women’s Health

This course will review women’s health issues from a feminist perspective. Topics covered will range from physiology of menstruation, sexuality, violence, disability, body image, mental health, childbirth to various constructions of health and disease across the lifespan. Constructions of gender and health and their intersections of social, racial, ethnic and political aspects will be considered.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021

WGS 322: Black Feminist Health

Black Feminist Approaches to Health — This course examines black women’s health, longevity, and well-being from a black feminist perspective and focuses on how the interlocking systems of racism, poverty, violence, and sexism influence the embodied health experiences of black women. We will survey black feminist and proto-feminist coping strategies of historical and contemporary health crises. Advisory Pre-Requisite: WGS/AMCULT 240 (WOMENSTD/AMCULT 240) Intro to Women’s Studies or WGS/NURS 220 (WOMENSTD/NURS 220) Perspectives in Women’s Health or WGS 250 (WOMENSTD 250) Race, Gender and Nation.

Credits: 3

Fall 2021

WGS 345: Special Topics in Gender in a Global Context  (Section: 001 Sexual Violence and the State)

This course examines, through a comparative, transnational, and intersectional feminist lens, the complex relationship(s) between sexual violence and the state under differing historical contexts and in diverse geographical locations. We will interrogate the colonial and the postcolonial, “first” and “third” worlds, text and context. Tracing how gender intersects with race, religion, nation, social class, and sexuality, we will frame sexual violence as simultaneously personal and political as we critically examine the political, cultural, legal, regulatory and discursive roles of the state. Some of the material focuses on South Asia; however, the scope of the course is historically and geographically broad. The course is interdisciplinary; we will draw from historical, literary, visual, political, sociological and other perspectives and the productive interstices between them. We will weave together theoretical, analytical, and creative (e.g. fiction, film, art) texts. There will also be in-class case studies that we will collectively examine.

Credits: 3

Winter 2021/Fall 2021