Translation of an Evidenced-Based Violence Intervention for Adolescents in Primary Care (SafERteens-PC)


The SafERteens Study demonstrated the efficacy of a brief intervention (BI) for violence on changing attitudes, self-efficacy, and reducing violent behaviors, peer victimization, and violence-related consequences among adolescents in the emergency department (ED). The proposed two-phased pilot study will customize this efficacious violence intervention for the unique constraints of primary care settings and test implementation using the RE-AIM framework.

There is a tremendous need within public health to accelerate the transfer of evidenced-based interventions into routine clinical care. The SafERteens Study demonstrated the efficacy of a brief intervention (BI) for violence on changing attitudes, self-efficacy, and reducing violent behaviors, peer victimization, and violence-related consequences among adolescents in the emergency department (ED). Using a RE-AIM framework to measure outcomes (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance), we are currently conducting a study to translate this efficacious BI for violence into clinical practice in the ED. Consistent with the REP model, we have created a SafERteens implementation Package, which is housed on a website (www.saferteens.org), and includes: 1) a self-administered screen via iPad; 2) training materials (e.g., standardized patient videos); 3) clinician tools to guide intervention delivery; and 4) a tailored text message booster program. To increase reach and impact on reducing youth violence, the next logical step is to implement SafERteens into primary care. Primary care represents a logical dissemination channel for the SafERteens intervention because 95% of adolescents report having a usual place for primary health care, with 75% receiving medical care in the past six months. Violence interventions have yet to be systematically implemented in primary care settings despite the alarming prevalence of violent behaviors among adolescents. Thus, the proposed two-phased pilot study will customize this efficacious violence intervention for the unique constraints of primary care settings and test implementation using the RE-AIM framework. The specific aims of this study are to: Aim 1: Customize SafERteens for primary care (SafERteens-PC) delivery, based on feedback from clinic staff (e.g., providers, administrators). We will conduct qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys of clinic staff to obtain feedback, to maximize successful adaption of program components (in Phase 2). We will also collect data from participants over time as a control group (n=50). Aim 2: Implement customized SafERteens-PC package in primary care using E-REP (e.g., tailored program based on Aim 1 plus external facilitation) and measure feasibility using RE-AIM (intervention group; n=50).